BOOK CLUB: THE PAPER GARDEN BY MOLLY PEACOCK

10:30 a.m. March 11, 2014

 

Join the NOMA Book Club! Each month Book Club reads art-related fiction and non-fiction, and engages in discussion groups, curatorial programs and field trips correlating with each book.

Book Club members may buy their reading selections at the NOMA Museum Shop at a 20% discount. Call the Shop at (504) 658-4133 for more information.

To join NOMA Book Club or for more information, contact Sheila Cork at (504) 658-4117 or at scork@noma.org.

To celebrate Art in Bloom presented by Whitney Bank, the Book Club will be reading the story of Mary Delaney, an artist who began creating paper collage flowers at the age of 72. The Book Club is looking for lots of additional participants for this month’s events, so please join us! Full details on the book and the discussion events are below.

Tuesday, March 11:

  • 10:30 a.m.-12:00 p.m.: Discussion Groups in various NOMA galleries
  • 12:00 p.m.: Break for lunch (on our own)
  • 2:30-3:30 p.m.: program (details tba)
  • 3:30 p.m.: docent-led tours through NOMA’s galleries

All programs are open to the public and free with NOMA admission. For more information and to register for the events contact Sheila Cork.

Art in Bloom kicks off with a patron party on Wednesday, March 19, and is open to the public Thursday, March 20 – Sunday, March 23. For information about Art in Bloom contact Kristin Jochem, Donor Relations and Events Manager, kjochem@noma.org or (504) 658-4121.

MARCH’S SELECTION

The Paper Garden: an Artist Begins her Life’s Work at 72 by Molly Peacock

“Intelligent and well read, a quintessential member of the British aristocracy but with a mind of her own, Mary Granville Pendarves Delany (1700-1788) was a late bloomer. Born to a noble family of moderate fortune, she was married, first at 17 to a much older, drunken aristocrat, in midlife, more happily, she married a loving Irish clergyman. Widowed, she began at age 72 her remarkable art of cutting and creating the 985 floral “mosaicks” as she termed them-a precursor to collage. Delany rubbed elbows with Handel, Hogarth, Jonathan Swift, King George III, and Queen Charlotte. But Delany was even more fortunate to come under the wing of a duchess who brought the cutting work to the attention of Sir Joshua Reynolds and Horace Walpole.” (Publisher’s Weekly review on Amazon.com.)